Last edited by Malagor
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Soil heating in chaparral fires found in the catalog.

Soil heating in chaparral fires

Leonard F. DeBano

Soil heating in chaparral fires

effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff

by Leonard F. DeBano

  • 47 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [Berkeley, Calif.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil heating -- California.,
  • Chaparral ecology -- California.,
  • Fire ecology -- California.,
  • Prescribed burning -- California.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementLeonard F. DeBano, Raymond M. Rice, C. Eugene Conrad.
    SeriesResearch paper PSW -- 145.
    ContributionsRice, R. M. 1924-, Conrad, C. Eugene., Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21 p. :
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17704234M

    When subjected to fire, these downed woody fuels increased soil heating, which often surpassed lethal soil temperatures (i.e., threshold temperatures resulting in the death of living tissue: 40 °C to 70 °C for plant tissue, soil matter) when the soils were dry (Busse et al. ). [from the text] Chaparral covers million hectares as a discontinuous band of vegetation extending across Arizona in a northwest to southeast direction (Hibbert et al. ). It is an important vegetation type on both the Prescott and Tonto National Forests and is present, but to a lesser extent, on the Coronado and Kaibab National Forests in Arizona.

      Fighting fires with fuel. Clearing chaparral for firebreaks, a gap meant to slow spreading flames, also does little to help fire fighters battle the chaotic infernos driven by California's Santa. Check out Rick Halsey’s book, “Fire, Chaparral and Survival in Southern California” for a great read on this fascinating and important topic. About the Author. Social Share. 4 Comments Julia at am Reply. What is the composition of the chaparral biome’s soil? Nan at pm Reply. That is a great question.

    Some chaparral plant communities may grow so dense and tall that it becomes difficult for large animals and humans to penetrate, but may be teeming with smaller fauna in the understory. Many chaparral plant species require some fire cue (heat, smoke, or charred wood, and chemical changes in the soil following fires) for germination. José M. Moreno, Walter C. Oechel, Fire Intensity as a Determinant Factor of Postfire Plant Recovery in Southern California Chaparral, The Role of Fire in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems, /_3, (), ().


Share this book
You might also like
Longman Book Project: Fiction: Band 1: Ben Biggins Cluster

Longman Book Project: Fiction: Band 1: Ben Biggins Cluster

Proceedings of the 10th summit of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)

Proceedings of the 10th summit of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD)

Report of Her Majestys Chief Inspector of Fire Services for England and Wales 1989

Report of Her Majestys Chief Inspector of Fire Services for England and Wales 1989

A new year in a new life (McGraw-Hill reading)

A new year in a new life (McGraw-Hill reading)

ecological basis of interactions between organisms

ecological basis of interactions between organisms

Henry Jamess The American

Henry Jamess The American

Waterlows solicitors and barristers diary.

Waterlows solicitors and barristers diary.

lordship of Petty.

lordship of Petty.

Agricultural meteorology

Agricultural meteorology

Little Miss Star

Little Miss Star

Exhortations and admonitions of Our Venerable Father and founder Father Francis Mary of the Cross Jordan

Exhortations and admonitions of Our Venerable Father and founder Father Francis Mary of the Cross Jordan

Superfund research (H.R. 2802, the Superfund Cleanup Technology Research and Demonstration Act of 1985)

Superfund research (H.R. 2802, the Superfund Cleanup Technology Research and Demonstration Act of 1985)

Archbishop of Toronto presents to his devoted clergy and laity his archdiocesan report for the year 1936.

Archbishop of Toronto presents to his devoted clergy and laity his archdiocesan report for the year 1936.

Louisiana under the rule of Spain, France, and the United States, 1785-1807

Louisiana under the rule of Spain, France, and the United States, 1785-1807

John C. Parkinson.

John C. Parkinson.

Stuart period, 1603-1714

Stuart period, 1603-1714

Early America, 1492-1812

Early America, 1492-1812

U.S. apparent consumption of alcoholic beverages

U.S. apparent consumption of alcoholic beverages

Soil heating in chaparral fires by Leonard F. DeBano Download PDF EPUB FB2

From the text: 'Chaparral brushlands in southern California burn as often as every 30 years (Muller and others ). Sincethe State's Public Resources Code has set forth fuel hazard reduction as a primary goal in the management of public lands.

A variety of techniques are available in attempts to reduce fuel hazards. One of these techniques—prescribed burining—has. The information is useful in estimating the effects of fire on soils in chaparral ecosystems. Citation: DeBano, Leonard F.; Rice, Raymond M.; Eugene, Conrad C.

Soil heating in chaparral fires: effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff. Res. Paper PSW-RPCited by: Get this from a library.

Soil heating in chaparral fires: effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff. [Leonard F DeBano; R M Rice; C Eugene Conrad; Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)] -- This state-of-the-art report summarizes what is known Soil heating in chaparral fires book the effects of heat on soil during chaparral fires.

We documented patterns of surface heating associated with chaparral fire to characterize fundamental scale variation in the intensity of this stand-replacing disturbance.

To test how this variation may influence community structure, we studied its effect on the soil seed bank and the distribution of seedlings and resprouts that emerged after fire.

We documented patterns of surface heating associated with chaparral fire to characterize fundamental scale variation in the intensity of this stand‐replacing disturbance.

To test how this variation may influence community structure, we studied its effect on the soil seed bank and the distribution of seedlings and resprouts that emerged after Cited by: Fire, Soil Heating, and the Formation of Vegetation Patterns in Chaparral Article (PDF Available) in Ecological Monographs 70(1) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

While the sensitivity of vascular plant tissue to high temperatures is known (LevittPrecht et al. ), the soil depth where most resprout propagules occur, the heat flux they are exposed to in chaparral fires, and the effects of long-duration heating are not known (Borchert and Odion ).

To examine how fire might increase a soil's vulnerability to aeolian transport, intact soil samples were collected from a chaparral landscape in southern California and heated with a propane torch with temperatures ranging from to °C and for durations of 5–60 min to simulate a variety of burn severities.

For example, only minimal soil heating occurs during a cool burning prescribed fire in forests compared to low intensity fires in chaparral (fig. 1A, B).

Although canopy consumption occurs during prescribed burning in chaparral, fire intensities in chaparral vary considerably and, as a result, produce different amounts of soil heating (fig.

1B, C). Retrieval Terms: chaparral; brush fires; soil heating; heat effects. The Revised Fire Management Policy, adopted by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, in"encourages land managers to make more use of prescription fire to protect, maintain, and enhance the.

This state-of-the-art report summarizes what is known about the effects of heat on soil during chaparral fires. It reviews the literature on the effects of such fires on soil properties, availability and loss of plant nutrients, soil wettability, erosion, and surface runoff. And it reports new data collected during recent prescribed burns and a wildfire in southern California.

Wildfires and prescribed burns are common throughout Arizona and California chaparral. Predicting fire effects requires understanding fire behavior, estimating soil heating, and predicting changes in soil properties.

Substantial quantities of some nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, are lost directly during combustion. Highly available nutrients released during a. Soil was heated to various temperatures in factorial combination with various soil moistures to determine the direct effects of fire and soil moisture on the survival of microorganisms in chaparral soil.

For fungi, mild heating increased germination of dormant forms yielding significantly higher counts than those in unheated soil.

Debano LF, Rice RM, Conrad CE () Soil heating in chaparral fires: Effects on soil properties, plant nutrients, erosion, and runoff. Us Forest Service Research Paper PSW 21 pp.

Google Scholar Hudson GJ, John PMV, Bailey BS, Southgate DAT () The automated determination of carbohydrate. In chaparral the vast majority of species regenerate rapidly by resprouting new shoots from the base of burned stems.

In addition, many of the dominate species possess dormant seed banks that have accumulated for decades in the soil. These seeds are triggered in unison to germinate after fire by cues such as intense heat or smoke.

Most of the heat from a fire is directed upward, but substantial temperatures at the soil surface can be achieved due to fuel load and residence time. Heating and soil alteration can be significant if the fire residence time is long, or a thin, dry litter layer is. the upper mineral soil layers as a re­ sult of soil heating.

Different tech­ niques are required for assessing fire effects on each (combustion and soil heating effects). However, to under­ stand either of these effects, it is im­ portant to be aware of the fire's unique behavior in chaparral.

Although fire. All catastrophic fires occur during the extreme Santa Ana wind conditions. Chaparral fire intensity depends on the mixture of plants in the chaparral and age of the individual plants.

The ratio of dead to live fuel is much greater in old than in young chaparral and varies from species to species. To examine how fire might increase a soil's vulnerability to aeolian transport, intact soil samples were collected from a chaparral landscape in southern California and heated with a propane torch with temperatures ranging from to °C and for durations.

FIRE, SOIL HEATING, AND THE FORMATION OF VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CHAPARRAL FIRE, SOIL HEATING, AND THE FORMATION OF VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CHAPARRAL Odion, Dennis C.; Davis, Frank W.

We documented patterns of surface heating associated with chaparral fire to characterize fundamental scale variation in the. Fire-stimulated seed germination from soil seedbanks is also common in mixed and crown fire regimes.

Dormant seeds in the soil show heat-stimulated seed germination, especially in legumes and other clades with hard seed coats (eg, members of Rhamnaceae). Thick seed coats prevent imbibition of water until cracked by the heat of a fire.FIRE, SOIL HEATING, AND THE FORMATION OF VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CHAPARRAL DENNIS C.

ODION' AND FRANK W. DAVIS 'Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, California USA Abstract. We documented patterns of surface heating associated with chaparral fire to characterize funda.A comparison of chaparral fire soil heat profiles from DeBano () and Weirich (unpublished) indicates that under higher fire intensity situations in chaparral a different soil heating mechanism other than just conduction heating may be at work.

In contrast to the slow moving low temperature.