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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Kenaf fibres for pulping and papermaking. found in the catalog.

Kenaf fibres for pulping and papermaking.

Harshad Pande

Kenaf fibres for pulping and papermaking.

by Harshad Pande

  • 20 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination184 leaves.
Number of Pages184
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18548780M
ISBN 100612412652

3. Handmade paper making for rural development 5 4. Materials Required for Hand Made Paper Production 6 Mould and deckle 8 5. MCRC’s technology on Hand made Paper Production 10 Raw material selection 10 Extraction of Fiber from Plants 10 Screening of Microoraganisms for Biotreatment 11 Bio Pulping & Bio-bleaching 12 Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is an annual, non-wood cellulosic plant fiber. Kenaf is being promoted as a potential fibrous raw material for the pulp and paper industry in the countries experiencing.

materials from which papermaking fibers can be extracted. The common species include, for example, rice straw, wheat straw, bamboo, bagasse, kenaf, flax, cotton, sisal, jute, and hemp, to name a few. Within that mixed portfolio, oil palm is one of the nonwoods that shows great potential as a papermaking raw material. Owing to its economic.   This book is perfect for anyone who works in or is curious about the pulp and paper industry. It covers all the different stages of the pulp and paper creation process starting from tree to finished product. The book covers such topics as mechanical pulping, chemical pulping, paper making, and environmental s: 3.

Kenaf pulping need less use of chemicals. Kenaf pulping consumes less energy then wood pulping (Kenaf lignin content is lower). Another advantage of Kenaf over wood is its higher rate of production in terms of tons of biomass for land/time units. Introduction and the Literature: Introduction to Papermaking. Introduction to the Literature. Abstract Indices. Technical and Trade Journals. Reference Books. Textbooks. Chemistry Reference Books. Other References. Wood and Fiber Fundamentals: Wood and Bark. Wood Chips and Sawdust. Wood Chip Preparation and Handling at the Pulp Mill. Solid Wood Measurement.


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Kenaf fibres for pulping and papermaking by Harshad Pande Download PDF EPUB FB2

Kenaf Pulping and Papermaking Unbound – January 1, by Gary C. Myers (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Unbound, January 1, "Please retry" — — — Unbound — The Amazon Book Review Book recommendations, author interviews, editors' picks, and more.

Author: Gary C. Myers. Abstract. Samples of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) grown in Malaysia were examined to determine the kraft pulp and papermaking properties of their bast (or bark) kraft pulping process showed that bast fibers were relatively easy to cook resulting good pulp yields in the range of 45–51%.Cited by: Samples of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) grown in Malaysia were examined to determine the kraft pulp and papermaking properties of their bast (or bark) fibers.

Using kraft pulping process showed that Author: Alireza Ashori. This book gives emphasis to wood fiber raw materials, alternative sources of fibers for paper production, environmental issues, paper quality improvement and cost of paper production.

Varieties of non-wood raw materials, including kenaf, rice straw, empty fruit bunches of palm trees, bamboo, bagasse, etc., are considered in this book. short core fibers are much like those obtained from hardwoods.

Many types of paper are made from a blend of hard and softwoods, and kenaf provides a natural blend of such a fiber mixture. Initial chemical pulping trials showed that disintegration of the plant material to primary fibers is easier because of the lower density of the stems than.

The leaves of certain plants are valuable for pulp and papermaking because of the ample cellulose, such as banana leaves, sisal, abaca, sugarcane leaves, and so on. In recent years, the most commonly used non-wood fiber is straw, accounting for 46%, followed by bagasse Cited by: 2.

Kenaf fiber yarns were woven to dimensions of mm × mm with 3 mm opening size including hexagonal, plain, and knot-plain patterns as shown in Fig. Woven kenaf were investigated to find the suitable pattern for soil reinforcement. Kenafsoda pulp was prepared by cook­ ing whole, chopped kenaf for 2 hr at °C with or 19% applied active alkali and combining the cooks.

Part of this pulp was bleached to about 65% brightness by treating it with hypo­ chlorite (6% available CD for 2 hr at 40°C and pH 8. Pulp testing Refining was done in a PFI mill using.

Experiment have taken place as to the use of the bast fibres, or whole stem pulping for paper production [14]. Kenaf is seen as an alternative to timber plantation fibre sources. Other names for Kenaf include Bimli, Ambary, Ambari Hemp, Deccan Hemp, and Bimlipatum Jute. A short fibre with faint crossmarkings, Kenaf fibres end in a variety of.

Pulping and Papermaking of Non-Wood Fibers. October ; DOI: /intechopen In book: Pulp and Paper Processing; Authors: Zhong Liu. Huimei Wang.

adding AQ in Kenaf pulping. HEMP fibers in papermaking • the oldest surviving piece of paper from hemp – China ( – 87 B.C.) • the first European papermaking in the 16th century • until the 19th century - rags (hemp and flax fibers) • growing need for paper - rag supply insufficient • exploitation of wood – abundant and cheap • today, only about 5 % of world s paper is made from.

Trial pulping tests on kenaf grown in the USA showed that the bark and core fibres have good papermaking properties, the fibres require little refining energy, the pulp can be bleached to the same brightness levels as conventional wood pulps and it can be used in producing different grades of paper (Kalgren et al., ).

containing recycled kenaf fibers, and the compatibility of kenaf with conventional recycling systems. Printing Characteristics of Kenaf Based Papers We produce a variety of kenaf-based papers that are made from % kenaf, blends of kenaf and recycled pulps, kenaf and virgin pulp blends, as well as coated products.

Volume 6 Chemical Pulping Part 2, Recovery of Chemicals and Energy. Book editor: Panu Tikka, Professor, SciTech Service Oy Ltd, Espoo, Finland.

The book covers kraft pulp mill technology from fibre line spent liquor — black liquor — to the recovered active cooking chemical — white liquor — and energy in the form of steam and electricity. This book basically comprises of bio refiner mechanical pulping of bast type fibres, use of trichromatic colourimetery for measurement of brightness and yellowness of bleached pulps, finishing and converting, coating equipment, chemical and additives in papermaking, mixed pulping of jute stick and other agricultural residues etc.

The amount of cellulose fiber in wood determines the pulp yield, ease of pulping and cost of pulp produced. The importance of fiber length is explained in pulp properties.

The maximum average fiber length pulp will have is that of wood because whatever pulping method, full chemical to full mechanical, fiber is going to damage. papermaking pulping Kenaf chemical pulps fibers harversting mechanical pulps occurrence structure Kerosene Kraft pulping bagasse bamboo kenaf reeds Lignin bagasse bamboo corn stalks esparto hemp jute kenaf non-wood plant fibers papyrus reeds sabai grass straw Lime process Lime-soda process Linseed oil Machines, see equipment Magnesium sulfate.

Stock Preparation and Additives for Papermaking -- 9. Paper Manufacture -- Fiber from Recycled Paper -- Environmental Impact -- Metric and English Units and Unit Analysis -- Introductory Chemistry Review -- Analytical and Coordinate Chemistry -- Calculations of Wood, Paper and Other Materials -- Pulping Calculations.

Kenaf has a unique combination of long bast and short core fibers which makes it suitable for a range of paper and cardboard products. Scientists at the ARS have tested several kenaf pulping techniques, with the pulps being used to make several grades of paper including newsprint, bond, coating raw stock and surfaced sized.

Kenaf contains approximately 25 percent less lignin than wood fiber, which translates into lower chemical and energy requirements in the pulping process.

Kenaf reaches feet. Kenaf [etymology: Persian], Hibiscus cannabinus, is a plant in the family Malvaceae also called Deccan hemp and Java jute. Hibiscus cannabinus is in the genus Hibiscus and is native to southern Asia, though its exact origin is name also applies to the fibre obtained from this plant.

Kenaf is one of the allied fibres of jute and shows similar characteristics. Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus)is an annual non-wood plant which has shown great potential as an alternative source of papermaking fiber.

The purpose of this research was to investigate the suitability of Malaysian cultivated kenaf fibers in the production of high quality printing : Alireza Ashori.The success of kenaf in papermaking has relied on its high yield per hectare (about 20 t/ha yr) and the quality of its bast fibers, with a low lignin content, which provides paper with a strength exceeding that of paper from conifer fibers.